Much Is Taken

“You expect me to believe you’re over eight hundred years old?” “I don’t expect you to believe it but I’m closer to ten thousand and if you don’t listen to me then you and half this city will be dead within a week.” The Story Much is Taken is the first in a trilogy of books named The Neverman Chronicles. This series follows the life and trials of the world’s only immortal as he evolves from a comically inept hunter-gatherer to a true master of the modern age. Drawn to history’s greatest events by an instinct he can neither understand nor resist, he has been our ever-present witness. But now that instinct is telling him to run. A shadow is falling over the wounded city that he calls home, one which threatens to undo all that he has fought so hard to protect. Racing against time and unseen foes he must discover whether he has the strength to deny his own destiny and save us from ourselves. Never before has so much been at stake, never before has he had so much to lose. The Author I’m a daydreamer, a ginger, and an unrepentant sci-fi junkie. I got hooked on the genre when I was a kid and I’ve been devouring it ever since. I love all the what ifs and why nots that can be explored within the covers of a good science-fiction story. So, when a ‘what if’ of my own presented itself, I wrote it down and then I wrote some more. Next thing I knew I had a three book story arc, a chapter by chapter overview for the first installment, and twenty chapters worth of first draft. This was

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Avatars and cosmic order, Rate My Science

ratemyscience.com Publish your projects or ideas FREE at Rate My Science. In Hinduism, an avatar (from Sanskrit avatāra अवतार in the Devanagari script, meaning “descent”) is a deliberate descent of a deity to earth, or a descent of the Supreme Being (ie, Vishnu for Vaishnavites) and is mostly translated into English as “incarnation,” but more accurately as “appearance” or “manifestation”. The Sanskrit noun avatāra is derived from the verbal root tṝ “to cross over”, joined with the prefix ava “off , away , down”. The avatars of Vishnu are a primary component of Vaishnavism. An early reference to avatar, and to avatar doctrine, is in the Bhagavad Gita. Shiva and Ganesha are also described as descending in the form of avatars. In 1994, director James Cameron wrote an 80-page treatment for Avatar, drawing inspiration from “every single science fiction book” he had read in his childhood as well as from adventure novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs and H. Rider Haggard. From January to April 2006, Cameron worked on the script and developed a culture for the film’s aliens, the Na’vi. Their language was created by Dr. Paul Frommer, a linguist at USC. The Na’vi language has a vocabulary of about 1000 words, with some 30 added by Cameron.

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Avatars bring righteousness to the social and cosmic order, Rate My Science

ratemyscience.com Publish your projects or ideas FREE at Rate My Science. In Hinduism, an avatar (from Sanskrit avatāra अवतार in the Devanagari script, meaning “descent”) is a deliberate descent of a deity to earth, or a descent of the Supreme Being (ie, Vishnu for Vaishnavites) and is mostly translated into English as “incarnation,” but more accurately as “appearance” or “manifestation”. The Sanskrit noun avatāra is derived from the verbal root tṝ “to cross over”, joined with the prefix ava “off , away , down”. The avatars of Vishnu are a primary component of Vaishnavism. An early reference to avatar, and to avatar doctrine, is in the Bhagavad Gita. Shiva and Ganesha are also described as descending in the form of avatars. In 1994, director James Cameron wrote an 80-page treatment for Avatar, drawing inspiration from “every single science fiction book” he had read in his childhood as well as from adventure novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs and H. Rider Haggard. From January to April 2006, Cameron worked on the script and developed a culture for the film’s aliens, the Na’vi. Their language was created by Dr. Paul Frommer, a linguist at USC. The Na’vi language has a vocabulary of about 1000 words, with some 30 added by Cameron.

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