Best Sci Fi Novels of the 2000′s

My top 5 Science Fiction novels of the two thousands. For science fiction readers, witnessing the clock turn over to the year 2000, was a special feeling indeed. The divide had been crossed, the next century was here, and distant years bandied about solely in sci fi classics, would now play out in reality. Here’s my top 5 novels in reverse order. Number 5 Brasyl, by Ian McDonald. This is cyberpunk Brazil wrapped in a quantum computational view of cosmology. MacDonald takes what he started in his brilliant River of Gods even further, and the results are spectacularly mind blowing. Number 4 The Windup Girl, by Paolo Bacigalupi. This stunning, beautiful, yet brutal debut is set in a bleak future Thailand grappling with famine, global warming, and genetically modified bio-plagues. Bacigalupi masterfully weaves together dimensional characters with one of the most compelling geopolitical backdrops I’ve seen in science-fiction, in any medium. Number 3 Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell, by Susanna Clarke. Neil Gaiman called this “the finest English novel of the fantastic to appear in the past 70 years.” Indeed, it is fantastic — finely textured with rich Tolstoy-esque characterizations, moral ambiguity, and fascinating depictions of magic. This is a dizzying, powerful invention. Number 2 Baroque Cycle, (Quicksilver, The Confusion, The System of the World), by Neal Stephenson. Spanning the history of science and economics in the West, this glorious 2600-page epic celebrates reason

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SFFMeta Science Fiction New Releases – August 21, 2012

The Apex Book of World SF 2 Image The Apex Book of World SF 2
Edited by Lavie Tidhar
Published on August 21, 2012
80(1)

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TKN Full Episode 948

TKN Full Episode 948 from Teen Kids News. Like this? Watch the latest episode of Teen Kids News on Blip! blip.tv A BLOCK: This week?s top story, sponsored by the National Road Safety Foundation, deals with some of the most dangerous times for teens to drive: prom season and the summer. Scott shows us how a video to teach teens about these dangerous times was made. We go behind the scenes as the video is created and learn about the techniques the producers? used to get the message across. B BLOCK: Nicole reports on Lincoln Center Theater?s Songwriting in the Schools program. Students, in collaboration with professional lyricists, create characters and write songs. Composers then work with the students to turn their creations into music. CC: ARTS C BLOCK: In sports, Hannah finds out that Quidditch is not just for Wizards! She meets the ?muggle? Vassar College Quidditch team and learns first-hand, how to play this increasingly popular sport. There are nearly 200 Quidditch teams across the country and abroad. CC: PHYSICAL EDUCATION Eden tells us about a couple who created a poll on Facebook to choose a name for their baby. CC: TECHNOLOGY D BLOCK: This week?s Book Report is about Memory, written, by 14 year old Brian Yu. Brian wrote the science fiction book in 30 days, during National Novel Writing month in November. He takes us through the process of writing, editing, designing the cover and even getting it self-published. He?s now selling the book on Amazon. CC: ENGLISH

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Top Sci Fi Books of the 60′s

tinyurl.com Best Science Fiction Novels of the 60′s This was the decade when human beings first went into space, with tentative suborbital flights, becoming more and more adventeurous until finally landing on the moon in 1969. Every science fiction writer and reader got to tell their families and friends “I told you so!” It was the heyday of the paperback and for the first time, science fiction books regularly hit the best-seller list. The psychedelic 1960′s love-generation political revolution hippie “drugs, sex, rock & roll” era penetrated science fiction with a movement called “The New Wave”, characterized by stylistic experiment, rejection of standards, emphasis on relevance, bold and sometimes obscene language, and altered states of consciousness. This movement reached its high point in Harlan Ellison [as editor] “Dangerous Visions”, the most important anthology of the decade by far. Yet at the same time, there was a backlash of traditional “hard Sci Fi” novels led by former Caltech student Larry Niven. Here is my top 5 in reverse order… No. 5 The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert A Heinlein Tom Clancy has said of Robert A. Heinlein, “We proceed down the path marked by his ideas. He shows us where the future is.” Nowhere is this more true than in Heinlein’s gripping tale of revolution on the moon in 2076, where “Loonies” are kept poor and oppressed by an Earth-based Authority that turns huge profits at their expense. A small band of dissidents, including a one

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Top Science Fiction Books of the 70′s

tinyurl.com The 1970s was not a decade of stylistic revolution such as the “New Wave” of the late 1960s, but perhaps a decade of consolidation, where the lessons learned from mainstream literature, “New Wave” experimentalism, and the classics of science fiction were melded into a healthy hybrid. For example, leading author of the literature of paranoia Thomas Pynchon published a mainstream bestseller which used experimental techniques and was unquestionably science fiction: “Gravity’s Rainbow.” Samuel R. Delany, who had astonished readers with his adventurous works written while he was still a teenager absorbed academic theories and Semiotics to produce massive and puzzling works such as “Dhalgren.” EL Doctorow blurred the line between history, fiction, and fantasy with Nebula finalist “Ragtime.”Italo Calvino wowed his native Italian audiences, and critics, then the world at large with hyper-modern fantasy and science fiction which was nonetheless solidly based on his study of Italian folktales. Kingsley Amis, known for many mainstream and satirical novels, also wrote science fiction and was a useful critic of its literary history. William Kotzwinkle was marketed as mainstream, but his giddy fantasies such as “Doctor Rat” were embraced by our genre.

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Best Science Fiction Novels of the 90′s

tinyurl.com This was the decade in which we discovered traces of fossil life on Mars, found out that half the life on Earth was Archean which we didn’t know existed until recently, and also realized that we’d underestimated the number of galaxies in the cosmos by at least 50%, decided that the universe will keep expanding forever, demonstrated the principal of quantum teleportation in the laboratory, discovered that Neanderthals built musical instruments (flute, shofar, bagpipes), launched a 77-year-old senator into orbit for his second time in 36 years, connected over a hundred million people on the World Wide Web, and if that isn’t a good time for science fiction, I don’t know what is! This is my top 5 Sci Fi Novels of the 90′s in reverse order. Number 5 Red Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson For eons, sandstorms have swept the barren desolate landscape of the red planet. For centuries, Mars has beckoned to mankind to come and conquer its hostile climate. Now, in the year 2026, a group of one hundred colonists is about to fulfill that destiny. Number 4 Cryptonomicon by Stephenson It would be easy to read this book as a simple, exciting multi-generation spanning adventure of war, code writers and code breakers, a myriad of pieces of stories that all weave together in the end. Quite the thrilling tale all on his own. However, there’s a deeper story here: one that asks what does true net neutrality really mean for the world and can a good crypto-system circumvent the attempts of

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Best Sci Fi Novels of the 80′s

tinyurl.com Best Science Fiction Novels of the 80′s The 1980s were a wonderful decade for science fiction books. It was, although not widely appreciated at the time, a golden age of speculative literature, with new styles and themes flourishing while the older strands of the tapestry were woven ever more richly. The sub-genre of “Cyberpunk” was launched by William Gibson and and promoted by Bruce Sterling. There was a resurgence of “hard Sci Fi”. Fantasy headed in unexpected directions, with major new voices, and horror (with Stephen King and John Crowley leading the pack) darkened into the “splatterpunk” subgenre, which held that the supernatural was part of a spectrum of terror that included the reality of serial killers, genocide, child molestation, and the like. Sophisticated writers created “cross-genre” books that combined aspects of Fantasy and Science Fiction in new ways, most notably JG Ballard and Gene Wolfe. Here is my top 5 in reverse order… No. 5 Contact by Carl Sagan It was probably sheer luck that caused the many radio telescopes of the Argus project to point at the star system of Vega at exactly the right time. If the telescopes hadn’t been looking at the star that night, the scientists watching over the signals picked up by the telescopes may never have discovered the first sign of life outside our planet. But they caught a broadcast of prime numbers, a message that would change the course of Earth’s history forever No. 4 Speaker for the Dead by Orson

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